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all the emphasis on genetics rather than the environment, which, of course, is a simple explanation. it also takes everybody off the hook. dr. gabor matÉ on attention deficit disorder, close encounters with drug addiction, and the destruction of american childhood. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. today, a democracy now! special with the canadian physician and bestselling author gabor matÉ. from disease to addiction, parenting to attention deficit disorder, dr. matÉ's work focuses on the centrality of early childhood experiences to the development of the brain, and how those experiences can impact everything from behavioral patterns to physical and mental illness. while the relationship between emotional stress and disease, and mental and physical health more broadly, is often considered controversial within medical orthodoxy, dr. matÉ argues too many doctors seem to have forgotten what was once a commonplace assumption, that emotions are deeply implicated in both the development of illness, ad
, the current environment. >> there will be a lot of interest to do something immediately. senator feinstein said that she will reintroduce the assault weapons ban, the first day that congress is back in session in january. commission is a good idea provided it has bipartisan membership and gun control supporters and gun control opponents on it to look at this as a comprehensive issue. we have to be careful moving too quickly. yet, we have to have a comprehensive approach on the commission. i commend the president doing the commission. this could be way to find consensus about useful steps to take. >> joe, what are the key factors? >> there is a demand for something to be done. every one of these crisis, we come back and talk about it for a week. then nothing happens. the commission is a good idea. i agree with karl pleatly. the makeup of the commission, that really, really needs gun advocates and gun control advocates from the industry, i think, would be a good idea. to sort of start to deal with this in a meaningful way. there are a number of issues. >> another question is how the nra fact
of situation? >> we absolutely do. whether it's in a school environment or home environment, we teach maintaining that firearm appropriately. whether it's on your person or a secured lock box. and again, this is not new for utah. you just haven't heard about it before. teachers have been carrying firearms in locked drawers for 12 years now. and my opponents will say the dire predictions were going to be that every argument between a teacher and student would result in gunfire. that hasn't happened. we result in gunfire. that hasn't happened. we haven't had accidental shootings. we haven't had guns left behind and we also haven't had gun shootings. >> all right, clark aposhian, thank you for your viewpoint. glad you were with us. thanks. >>> welcome back. when you think about charity, there are a million ways you can help. and a lot of stars do give back. but after matthew mcconaughey said he wanted his hands in the clay, so he started his own foundation, helping kids live healthier lives. we sat down recently in los angeles to talk about that and about something everyone in hollywood
. that is the environment, really, and has little to do with the overall world business environment. it is a question of confidence. the insurance company, they did not think it could happen. that is the same reason, the same pressure that will keep you from getting funding. that being said, find a way. do it. when i said he will do a lot more, i believe that every person of your age or younger, every person in the earth your age or younger, can go into orbit in his lifetime if he wants to. think about that. have people been able to say that? or at least two space. >> i wanted to thank you for taking time out of your day to come and talk to us. have you ever grown tired of your craft, and if so, how do you continue and improve your drive toward your career? >> have i grown tired in designing and building airplanes? >> yes. >> you know, i thought i did when i retired. i spent the last four months of a 46-year career working 70 plus hours a week, working in the shop. i wanted to get the flying car, that new design, flying before april 1, when i was going to retire. i worked on christmas day, a few mont
, is the environment. and i'm going to end by telling a story of a young harvard college graduate, beautiful spring day in 1844 went for a walk in the woods outside of concord, and he did a little fishing, and the fishing was good. and then he came to cook the fish into a chowder. it is boston, after all. [laughter] and the wind came and flicked the flames that he was using to nearby dry grass, and a fire started, and it spread, and it spread. and eventually, it turned into a raging inferno which burn withed down more than 300 acres of prime woodland. in his own day this man was cast away, and it's hard not to see they were right because i can't think of any young man living in boston or cambridge who did as much damage to the environment as this man did. he is, of course, henry david thoreau whose book walden seems to preach a gospel, but his own life tells a very different story. his own life preaches the moral that we are a destructive species, and if you love nature, stay away from it. [laughter] as, indeed, thoreau would have done the world a wonderful amount of good if he had stayed home. now, th
to stormwater infrastructure to transport water away from the urban environment. one approach was to carry waste and stormwater through the same pipe. this combined system was less expensive than building two individual pipe networks. and stormwater was seen as a way to flush out the sewers. through the 19th century, the combined system was considered state-of-the-art throughout the world, and is still in use in many cities today. but cities constructed these systems before treatment was the standard. and even today's largest treatment plant doesn't have the capacity to treat the sudden volumes of water rushing through a combined system during rain. the plant is overloaded, and the excess rainwater, mixed with untreated raw sewage, is diverted straight into local waterways, creating a combined sewer overflow, or cso. there are over 700 communities in the united states with combined sewer systems. the other approach was to separate wastewater from stormwater, using two pipe networks. this separate system simply carries the stormwater away from the city. but even separate systems pollute the water
to lay better eggs in this environment? >> no, but you'll be encouraged and inspired. >> reporter: fancy chickens do lay colored eggs, green and red. i tried one. it's really good. really good. i would definitely pay $100,000 for that egg. dan harris, abc news, new york. >> give it some gas, dan. >> the jet pack looks cool. the hen house, come on, now. every day. that looks like a good gift because that's something if you have that kind of money you can get into, you know what i mean? >> until you crash it. >> i don't have that kind of money. merry christmas, everybody. >>> this morning on "world news now," trouble times two. the west coast gets slammed again by powerful storms at the worst of times. >>> and with the tremendous snowfall and powerful wind swept rain, mother nature is not spending christmas and other parts of the country christmas cheer. it's monday, december 4. >> from abc news, this is "world news now." >>> and good monday morning, on this christmas eve. good to have brandy back in the house. it's been good. we had a little eggnog. >> we're making it a festive holiday. >
of the majority of republicans. his own republicans in a house. that is tricky about the current environment. dennis: his party left him hanging last time around on that plan b. if we go over the cliff and don't get a deal by january 1st, can't they get a deal week or two later? is not the end of the world. >> absolutely right those things get very hard. making a fix to the alternative minimum tax which will hit millions of americans at the end of the year unless something is done, retrofitting that will be difficult. it will be hard to get over the market's psychological impact of going over the cliff even briefly. one of the interesting things is the markets have been very blase about this. they think something will happen in the last few days of the year. if that doesn't happen there will be a psychological jolt because expectations will not have been met. that won't be a good thing but washington be in washington you can retrofit any solution and walk it back to the first of the year even a couple weeks into the year. dennis: a little bit of hope. thank you. shibani: starbucks taking of
about the entire financial environment in the country? >> i think washington's playing with fire. i don't think they realize this is not a game. people right now are unsettled, and they are not certain about the future, and they are adjusting budgets because people plan right now. job creators make their budgets for next year now. dagen: right. >> we're deciding how many people to hire. i have a buddy in rhode island running a factory with 500 employees and told the four department heads give me plans for 20% across the board cut if the fiscal cliff hits. i mean, this is the wrong posture. we don't want people that create jobs, people that decide how many people will be hired in the next year to be having -- to have bad karma now. we want people looking forward in a positive way, how we're going to grow into new markets, how to export more. we need the country to be more competitive so we can export to china, mexico, export to canada. that's critical, growth. if we have growth, we hire more people. dagen: drew, thank you, great to see you. happy new year. >> thank you, go rg iii. dagen:
events like the one in newtown. first, the psychologist of the killer. second, the environment of violence in our culture. third, the easy access to guns. each of these might explain any single event, but what we should be trying to understand is not one single event, but why we have so many of them. let's look at the facts. according to the u.n.'s office on drugs and crime, the u.s. gun homicide rate is 30 times that of france or australia. it is 12 times higher than the average for other developed countries. why is that? if psychology is the main course, we should see that we have 12 times as many psychologically disturbed people as the average. we don't. in fact, america takes mental disorders seriously, treats them and doesn't stigmatize them. we do better in this area than most of our peers. is america's popular culture much worse than other rich countries? not really since it's largely the same popular culture worldwide. england and wales are exposed to cultural influences as the u.s. yet, their rate of gun homicide is some 3% of ours. the japanese are at the cutting edge
. they're out in the street. if they come here, it's a real nice environment for them. >> everybody get into the ring. we'll have the wrap session. >> this week ip to talk about unity. in this gym we are a community. >> we not only do boxing but youth development. when you walk in the door, weert not only teaching you boxing. we're also teaching you that you have to go to school. we have three or four tutors that are trying to get these kids' grades up. i used to have average like b, cs. now i get as and bs. i joined boxing to stay away from the streets and to get my life together. it literally saved my life boxing. i want these kids to go to college for the next generation. it could be more powerful in life. we're more than just tough. we're also smart. i want to become a champion, and i want to show people that this neighborhood is not only about violence. that there's people in here in the neighborhood that are determined to become somebody in life. p if i help two, three kids a year, that's already a difference. just like boxing saved me, i'm trying to save others. >> we're giving i
. is there any evidence they're going to lay better eggs in this environment? >> no, but you as the farmer will be encouraged and inspired. >> reporter: fancy chickens do lay colored eggs, green and red. i tried one. it's really good. really good. i would definitely pay $100,000 for that egg. dan harris, abc news, new york. >> give it some gas, dan. give it some gas. >> the jet pack looks cool. we can all agree on that. the hen house, come on, now. >> you gave it a little gas to get up higher. >> thots how i get home from work every day. just float down central park west and i'm back home just like that. that looks like a good gift because that's something if you have that kind of money you can get into, you know what i mean? >> until you crash it. >> i don't have that kind of money. i need to borrow some from you, willis. merry christmas, everybody. >>> this is abc's "world news now" informing insomniacs for two decades. >>> making news in america this morning -- travel troubles on this christmas eve. >> millions of travelers are facing cancellation, delays, and the inevitable headaches w
women do quite well in those types of environments. technology helps both allowing people to handle different aspects of their lives but it can be a great environment to have a fulfilling career. >> you have worked with a very interesting, strong man. what is that like? any tips? >> larry summers, mark zuckerberg, at the white house. it's very interesting all these big guys want you to run their staff. how you handle them? -- how do you handle them? >> the common thread in a lot of the relationships with strong man is a kind of openness. by having that openness, you develop a real, trusting relationship. this is both with women and men, but i think one of the unique features of mark zuckerberg, he basically live the mission of the company, give people the power to connect and share to make the world more open, and he lives by that. he sits in the middle of our campus and his conference room is a glass box. >> does he come in every day? >> every day. he rarely travels. you cannot get him out with anyone else, but he is just sitting there living the mission. >> what is he doing? >> if
-show host bill bennett. and a look ahead at the political environment in 23,
made the trains run on time. that was the environment that i grew up in and i felt very comfortable when bill i asked me to finish the book. again, silly me, i thought i can do this. whether it was hubris or not -- >> what do you think he saw i knew that he had not seen in any of the other possible writers? >> we did talk about that. he told me once -- he said, try to find someone. he said, this is like a mother giving away her children to be raised by another. i would say, bill. he would say, nice try, but no. he said "if i wanted anyone, and i do not, i would want a writer." later, when he last, he said "paul, you have written 500, 600 feature stories. that is where i started." he saw the journalists as having the same tools as the historian when it comes to sourcing. when all of that is assembled, tell a story that would pass the campfire test, i call it, a bunch of folks sitting around a campfire. and i guess he liked my stories. >> so, if you had to pick out of this book your favorite story, what would they be? >> i enjoyed his battles over the american second front and when to
in this environment here now is mary, managing director with merchant forecast. you are a secret shopper, right? do i understand that correctly? >> come on. we have a team across america and the team is comprised of retail professionals. and they -- monitor stores across -- >> shop for a live. >> they shop for a living. it is a tough life. yes. they -- answer questions for us and compile the data and we publish our reports. >> the numbers that came out today were disappointing. we have now seen retail stocks fall for three days in a row because this holiday season is looking bad. is it that bad? >> it was going into last friday. and -- again, we cover the mall. going into last friday, everybody was panicked. because they weren't seeing the kind of retail -- >> retailers were panic. >> yes. those days before christmas, it spurred up. whether it pulls out the month is another store write. it looks promising for particular retailers. we have some -- we have some bright spots out there. cosmetics is great. we love ulta. lululemon setting the trend for all of that. >> two of my faves so par. >> costume je
discusses the political environment as we go into 2013 and the tone of american politics today. "washington journal" live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> the tapings system was top secret. seems the only people who knew for certain where my father, his secretary, and the secret service agent who installed it. that was until president nixon made white house taping famous and infamous, and other presidential recording systems were revealed. against the backdrop of watergate, the background of secret taping can seem problematic, but this is a unique and invaluable historic resources. on these tapes, history unfolds in real time in the most dramatic possible way. we hear the tense confrontations of the civil rights movements and the life or death decisions being made during the cuban missile crisis. >> caroline kennedy joined in on a discussion on the 1962 recordings of the late president in the oval office. tuesday evening at 7:00 p.m. eastern on c-span2. >> there were a number of attributes and memorial services last week for senator daniel inouye of hawaii. his remains have laid in state
in case they want to find a low security environment in which to go and steal weapons. new york has a problem with terrorist cells. so we also know which houses don't have guns. this is a severe danger to the community that this newspaper has brought about. >> gretchen: like i'm thinking, let's say now that somebody goes to rob one of these homes that they know they don't have guns, let's say something horrible happens, do those homeowners then have a lawsuit against the newspaper? >> you know, i don't necessarily think so. but i do think it would be smart for the homeowners and the gun owners to give notice to the newspaper that they fear for their security and their safety, that of their families and they would ask their -- the names and addresses be unpublished for purposes of safety. that's the minimum they can do at this point and ask for a written response from the newspaper. >> gretchen: very interesting. let's read the statement. this is from the journal news, the newspaper. the massacre in newtown, connecticut remains top of mind for many of our readers. our readers are und
tournament is housed in warren county. what we trio do is foster environment where people and businesses want to come to warren county. so we actually have the lowest marginal tax rates of the surrounding counties and we try taphouse there are environment to where we know we can only do so much in government. so essentially we don't try to do all things to all people. so in a lot of ways we say no more than we say yes, which i think is one of the keys in government is not just thinking about your own political vested interest, 'cause it's easy to make friends in politics by saying yes to everybody. if you think a checkbook is not really yours or the taxpayers, it's someone else's and you can pass out money like it's candy, everybody in the world is going to love you. but when you sit around and look somebody in the eye and say no, they tend not to like you. we've got the ability to do that inside of warren county. >> eric: a lot of municipals are having a hard time because of unions. how is your union contract? have you renegotiated any of those? or are those that were put in place years ago
by people. >> is there still a shot for consolidation in this world, in this environment, or in this sort of post too big to fail world nobody wants to try? >> there will be consolidation. when people start getting used to the prices that these places are worth. i mean remember that bank stock investors were used to seeing their institutions get bought and sold at significant multiples of book value. the returns that are coming out of banks today don't justify that kind of price. so when people start getting comfortable with what these institutions are worth they can only earn 8% or 9% on capital and 1% on -- >> we had an analyst on yesterday or the day before who said that the big winner in 2013 among the big banks was going to be jpmorgan. but that the big loser was going to be morgan stanley. do you buy that? >> no. i'm not sure that it's possible to predict that since the new year hasn't even started yet. the idea that jpmorgan could be the big winner, of course it's possible. but jpmorgan is so large and complex i'm not sure that it's possible to make that kind of prediction. >> what
to lay better eggs in this environment? >> no, but you as the farmer will be encouraged and inspired. >> reporter: fancy chickens do lay colored eggs, green and red. i tried one. it's really good. really good. i would definitely pay $100,000 for that egg. dan harris, abc news, new york. >> give it some gas, dan. give it some gas. >> the jet pack looks cool. we can all agree on that. the hen house, come on, now. that's how i get home from work every day. just float down central park west and i'm back home just like that. that looks like a good gift because that's something if you have that kind of money you can get into, you know what i mean? >> until you crash it. >> i don't have that kind of money. merry christmas, everybody. don't have that kind of money. merry christmas, everybody.
to be for this year. that creates an environment of complete uncertainty. they have people rushing to buy gold, silver, in some of these other commodities. i think the star with term-limit thing politicians so that once they do get elected, they handle our business. you and i and everyone else, we have budgets. we have to balance our budget. fifth we cannot spend more than we take in. if we do we run into issues. i think the same principle should apply it to the country and wish to get the house in order before we start slipping into second world status and which are having issues with some of the other countries. host: here is say tweet -- here is a story in "the hill." trisha is on the line from indiana, a democrat. caller: i am very glad to talk to you. happy holidays to everybody. i just had a comment on the fiscal of debate and have a look to us in the future. i really think that the gentlemen, i think he was from virginia, had a good point about term limits. there are politicians of both sides that are making a life career out of being a politician instead of getting elected to serve the people
with the environment, being off the grid, so there is no cell phone service here. and really, really appreciating your surroundings. the bay of fire in australia is in the most stunning, most unspoiled area of tazmania in the northwest coast. this is a place that really you have to be committed to going to, because part of the process of getting there is actually hiking for two days on these beautiful white sand dunes, and you hike -- it's not a lot of hiking, but you are definitely out there, and being a little bit adventurous. this is a place, again, that's off the grid. you're going to have no tvs, you're going to be pumping the water for your own showers. the reason you go there and the payoff, the incredible wildlife. you want to see wombats, wallabees, kangaroos, this is the place to go. hicks island is the brain child of an architect who was obsessed with how beautiful the surroundings were and wanted to celebrate that. so he built these incredible modern structures that are made of concrete, and the rooms only have three sides. that means one side is completely open to the elements. the brand-
that we begin to clean up our environment better, and in order to make sure that we're not sending men and women overseas in harm's way for foreign oil. [applause] >> thank you. >> there's so much to talk about. we are running just a little bit long. if he could indulge me, i have two last questions that i think you're terrific questions. -- are terrific questions. the first, the truth is that we're one of the few democracies in the world that has not had a team of president. why and when will we? [laughter] and could she be sitting among us today? [laughter] kelly, would you like to start? [laughter] >> i think i will be campaigning for a patent daily, my daughter, -- kate daly, for president. but absolutely, i think we will have a woman president. i really think it will certainly be in my lifetime if not soon. >> maybe 2016 when hillary runs. >> maybe. [laughter] [applause] >> did you have a thought on that, carol? >> i certainly do. [laughter] run, hillary, run. [laughter] >> i certainly know it will happen soon. the electorate is ready. i think the 2012 election is a real watershe
future where we are in harmony with the environment and the planet. a lot of corporations are doing those things, but not as well as corporations could. corporations could contribute still more toward human welfare and avoid doing damage in some areas where they do, if only we can correct what i have come to view as a very mistaken and ultimately counterproductive idea that has captured the business world. this is the idea that corporations are run well, when they are run to maximize shareholder value, specifically measured by share price. many people in the room may have the reaction, but isn't that something that has been accepted forever? don't we all know that the purpose of the corporation is to maximize profits for shareholders? i would say no, actually, that is not an idea that has been around forever. that is a pretty new idea. if you were to get in a time machine and go back and study the first eight decades of the 20th century, and it is at the beginning of the 20th century were refer start to see the great public corporations that we think of today when we think of corporations
would negatively impact the learning environment. he said he is for gun control and removing the barriers to mental health treatment >>> a teenager shot earlier this month is speaking out for the first time. she said she is lucky to be alive. a gunman stormed the mall and killing people. >> she and a friend were able to make it out to ask for help. >> it is bullet fragment that is she got out. >> people are sending cards. e-mailing. and saying they are praying for me. that helps. it is a big impact. >> she just got home from the hospital last week. she is hoping to return to school after winter break. >>> a dangerous happening in vacaville, the car was stopped at a chevron gas station. they found drugs along with several sawed-off shotguns. >> the way the weapons have been altered, they are designed to conceal, hide. and produce and inflict a lot of damage rapidly. >> getting the weapons off the street made our streets safer today. >> they took one person into custody and faces multiple counts with possession and intent to distribute drugs >>> they are trying to piece togethe
the question of canada to be cut? is it politically possible in this environment to get enough republicans and democrats to support a deal that the white house wants on deficit reduction? because they been to the altar so many times on this same issue, taxes, medicare, social security, defense spending, you must wonder, if there's any agreement possible. host: first, commented today from the senate republican leader mitch mcconnell, who will join his colleagues later today at the white house. [video clip] >> i told the president last night we would be happy to look at whatever he proposes. the truth is we are coming up against a hard deadline. as i said, this is a conversation we should have had months ago. republicans are not about to write a blank check or anything senate democrats before or just because we find ourselves at the edge of the cliff. that would not be fair to the american people. that said, we will see what the president has to propose. members on both sides will review it. then we will decide how best to proceed. hopefully, there's still time for an agreement of some kind
, from the larger political environment to do something. will this afternoon's meeting have an impact? too soon to say, but it's a step that's intended to show they're working at it. willie. >> kelly o'donnell on capitol hill. thank you. we're joined now by republican senator john thune of south dakota and democratic senator chuck schumer of new york. gentlemen, good morning. by my count, we're less than 90 hours away now from the new year's eve deadline. senator thune, let me start with you. what do you and republicans need from democrats to get a deal done? >> well, what we would like to see, willie, is first off something that deals with spending. we believe this isn't a revenue issue. this is a spending issue. that ought to be a part of any solution. secondly, we ought to focus on jobs and the economy. anything that is done ought to be focused on what can we do to get the economy expanding, create jobs. when people are working, they're paying more taxes. the government is generating more revenue. that makes all these problems smaller by comparison. jobs and growth ought to be a gu
want to cook it in a moist environment so it doesn't dry out of the ham. >> you didn't put a ton in there? >> not a lot. a couple of o.j. the at the bottom. >> it's a little uneven. i apologize for this. >> this is easy. you don't have to be particular about it. i'm not a chef but a cook. 375 in the oven until it's 145 degrees internally. it takes about 45 minutes. here is the ham. >> i know it's incredibly good. make this today. >> really easy. when you take it out of the oven, tent it with aluminum foil while it rests for a minute. if you peel it off too soon, it will get dry on you. the next thing to do in the same oven, 37 5 degrees is my easy h roasted sweet potato mash. these are four pounds sweet t potatoes and two pounds of vidalia onions and some salt and permanen pepper. it troroasts for 45 minutes. put it in after you put the ham in. you drop everything in here. this is simple. it's just roasted red potatoes or sweet potatoes, excuse me, some onions and the olive oil and salt and pepper on top. then four tablespoons of butter. >> there's the key right there. there it i
's hard to see opportunity in today's challenging environment. unless you have the right perspective. bny mellon wealth management has the vision and experience to look beyond the obvious. we'll uncover opportunities, find hidden risk, and make success a reality. bny mellon wealth management >>> washington essentially has shut down for the holidays with no deal in place to avoid the rapped lie approaching fiscal cliff. it's possible an agreement can be reached before the year is out, but is it probable? cnn takes a look at where it all stands. >> good afternoon, everybody. >> reporter: after speaking with party leaders friday afternoon, president obama called on congress to quickly come up with a solution to avert some end-of-year tax hikes associated with the fiscal cliff. >> in the next few days, i've asked leaders of congress to work toward a package that prevents a tax hike on middle-class americans, protects unemployment insurance for two million americans, and lays the groundwork for further work on both growth and deficit reduction. >> reporter: remarks came after house speaker joh
're all in a group in the roosevelt room or in the cabinet room. it is a more casual environment. they're sitting probably on couches or chairs near each other. but the problem, don, is that if the president tries to sweeten the deal to woo more republican votes, then he risks losing lots of democratic votes and vice versa. this is really an issue about the fundamental differences between the two parties, the role of government in american life, that's why it is so hard to get to a deal. >> how dramatic. who would think talking about money and fiscal issues would garner so much drama, jessica. >> reporter: well, it is washington. and it is a lot at stake. it is about people's taxes, and, you know, the social safety net in america. it is the difference between democrats and republicans. >> yeah. we're going to talk more about the money now. thank you, jessica yellin. appreciate it. to new york now, joining us rick neuman, chief business correspondent for "u.s. news & world report." i want to ask you about the tax increase if there is no deal and tax rates rise, when would workers begin
in the street. and if they come here, it's a real nice environment for them. >> everybody get into the ring. we're going to have the rap session. >> this week i want to talk about unity. in this gym, we are a community. >> we not only do boxing, we do youth development. when you walk in the door, we're not only teaching you boxing, we're also teaching you that you know you have to go to school. we have three or four tutors that we're trying to get these kids' grades up. i used to have average like b, cs, now i get as and bs. >> we're going to have to put everything we've got into that one minute. >> i joined boxing to stay away from the streets and to get my life together. so it literally saved my life, boxing. i want these kids to go to college for the next generation will be more powerful in our life. we're more than just tough. we're also smart. >> i want to become a champion. and i want to show people that this neighborhood is not only about violence, that there's people in here in the neighborhood that are determined to become somebody in life. >> if i help two, three kids a year, that's a
as possible. the longer this drags out, the more likely it is that the environment becomes more partisan, more toxic, and we don't put a sensible and gradual debt deal in place in time. so what i hope is that if they come up with this way to avert the tax increase for most american families, they also put in place some kind of process that keeps the discussions going. and really, they need to devote themselves to the discussions. january should not be put your head down and focus on ignoring the problem month. it should be bring the leaders back to washington and really have the talks start in earnest if they don't get this resolved in december which it appears clearly that they're not going to. >> okay. the debt ceiling, we're about to reach that limit next week as well. timothy geithner, the treasure secretariry saying he can keep the economy going for a couple of months. what are your hopes for that debt ceiling debate that no doubt is going to have to happen by what, february? >> the debt ceiling in the past has played an important role that is a speed bump when we are borrowing too quickl
people, there is a lot of entrepreneurial energy wearing to go. if you get a more benign environment, that energy would burst forth. host: jkl tweets in, raise in the tops tax rate will not make a dent in the annual deficit. money gravitates to tax write- offs and crafted loopholes. guest: that is what you are seeing happening in europe when they are raising tax rates. lower the rates, get rid of these massive deductions,, and you would see a cleaner code, and less corrupt code. host: valerie in new jersey on our line for democrats. caller: good morning. the more i listen to mr. forbes speak, i am reminded why the reasons why i have lately not been a consistent your of c- span -- viewer of c-span anymore. they twist the truth. there is no integrity and what is said anymore. if you look at the record of spending -- mr. forbes mentioned mr. obama's spending being higher than the bush years. that is not true. the deficit which increases our debt grew so much under obama because he put both wars into the budget. george bush kept him out of the budget -- them out of the budget. was not pa
environment. host: an editorial responding to and preparing for natural disasters is one of government's most important functions. it's as lawmakers should provide immediate relief without having to worry about demanding that spending to cut elsewhere. jan in springfield, mass., on the line for democrats. caller: 5 would like to say in florida in 2004 when they had all of the hurricanes, state farm insurance pulled out of the state and refused to ensure homes. people that have car insurance with state farm wanted to cancel their insurance. we found out the weight state farm is judging each state -- we found out state farm is judging each state. there are states where they are not making a profit so they are not insuring. global warming and new storms, the insurance companies need to look at their policies and unite them as americans. please quit referring to us as "ordinary" and referred to us as the backbone of the nation. guest: i was born in massachusetts, so i certainly feel you are part of the backbone of the nation. there is not reformed insurance policy coverage in this bill. a big pro
the impact of -- >> on the environment -- >> the death of a princess. >> live from the johnson space center. >> you feel as though they love you? >> never forget the primary mission, we're newscast. >> history -- >> i was really mad that i was nine months pregnant. i was not at the berlin wall. i was like, hello, it's coming down, and i am here and can't travel. this is not acceptable. >> the terrible destruction left in the wake of hurricane andrew -- >> tragic ending to a fairytale that never quite was right. >> if i'm feeling this sense of loss, then the viewers are certainly going to be feeling the sense of loss. we owe it to them to tell the story as best we can. >> people around the country have begun to mourn the kennedy family's apparent latest tragedy today. >> we'll have a look at all the irony and joy as well as the tragedy in the life of john kennedy jr. >> we have breaking news to report for you this morning. it appears that 6-year-old elian gonzalez has been removed -- >> oklahoma city, so much heartache and still hope. >> the people versus o.j. simpson. >> an elected presiden
credit is going to be available? >> pretty tight. credit is still tight. regulatory environment is still difficult. banks have got poor loan quality on overall basis of the businesses are looking at. business development corpse. there is microlending opportunities and crowd funding opportunities which is new basically angel investors with the fec has reduced some of their limitations for businesses to get funding. >> juliet: this seems like no brainer ecommerce is the way it is. cyber monday shows that. >> it's growing but still frankly at low levels. probably online sales are only about 7% of total sales. they estimate mobile commerce could be about a trillion in revenues in 2016, 2017. so ecommerce is growing significantly. there is is a loft businesses that are still not online and don't have an online presence. >> that makes no sense to me. a lot of businesses that don't know that they can go and create a simple web site to get online so you can jump on your mobile guess. if you are out looking for a pizza shop you are most likely looking for it on your mobile device. if you are not
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